St. Ippolito Festival

Is an annual festival held every August to pay special honor to our patron saint.


St Ippolito

Santo Ippolito

Santo Ippolito was martyred for his Catholic faith in the year 258 A.D at Ostia, near Rome during the persecution of Valerian, Emperor of Rome. The modern village of San Ippolito was originally called Napoli Piccola or "Little Naples" because of its natural resemblance to the modern city of Naples. It is a small town near Cosenza in Calabria, Italy. In the early nineteenth century, a terrible earthquake devastated San Ippolito. Almost the entire population and prominent buildings were destroyed, except for the church of Santo Ippolito. When survivors saw that not one stone of the church had been touched they accepted this as a heavenly sign and changed the name of the city to that of Santo Ippolito. They vowed to pay the saint special honors annually on his feast day of August 13th if he would pray for them and deliver them from other catastrophes. The people kept their promise, and every year in the month of August they celebrate the Santo Ippolito Festival for three days throughout their town.

To volunteer your time or items to the festival use our Contact Form.

1 Table and 8 Chairs are available for $30.00, payable at the time you pick up your table and chairs.

All monies collected during mass, pinning on the statue, tables, raffle and games goes directly to the St. Ippolito Society to defer cost associated with sponsoring the festival.
All board members are volunteers and receive no compensation for their time and effort.

About The Society of St. Ippolito

The festival is a time to share food with family and friends and reminisce about festivals gone by
while celebrating our Italian heritage.


Map

Many people of San Ippolito that migrated to America and settled in Lansing, Michigan decided to continue their festival tradition. Since the first festival in 1938 held at Resurrection Church, the St. Ippolito Festival has been celebrated on the grounds of Saint Cornelius Cyprian Catholic Church at Bunker Hill, Michigan. More than 1,500 people from mid-Michigan’s Italian American community come together to honor their beloved saint on the second Sunday of August every year. The Festival begins with a mass, followed by a procession and singing of the "Procession Song" in Italian. The festival is a time to share food with family and friends and reminisce about festivals gone by while celebrating our Italian heritage. There are games, music and activities for people of all ages.

Photo Gallery

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